Make Sure Eco-Friendly Building Look Nice: Building Them Is Hard Enough

An article on the New York Times website caught my attention this last weekend. BioRegional, the developers behind London’s BedZED development, the environmentally friendly housing unit in Hackbridge, are looking to build a new set of Green housing units in California.

BioRegional is hoping to replicate the successes, such as BedZED’s passive heating design that allows the development to go the winter without turning on any heating units. It also hopes to avoid the failings that have plagued the development, like the inability of the biomass hot water heater or reed-bed filtration system to get underway.

Environmentally friendly designs are becoming more and more popular, cost effective and important as climate change gains a larger role in policy initiatives. The new developments that have come about have been innovative and impressive. The BedZED development especially was progressive and impressive. The biggest problem I saw with it though, was not its inability to enact all of its grand ideas. It was the multi-coloured pipes coming out of each roof. The Lorax would balk, not because it was killing the trees but because it reminded him to much like a factory for sneeds (apologies if you have to look that reference up).

Environmentally friendly design can be quite attractive if it is done correctly. I am reminded of my trip to the Adnams distribution centre whilst working for CAMRA a few years ago. The building is designed with the same carbon cutting measures as the BedZED development, but is astonishing to look at. The sedum covered roof blends into the countryside as well as filtering rainwater into storage wells and soaking up carbon dioxide. It shows the value of a building being attractive, as well as environmentally friendly.

An article on the New York Times website caught my attention this last weekend. BioRegional, the developers behind London’s BedZED development, the environmentally friendly housing unit in Hackbridge, are looking to build a new set of Green housing units in California.

BioRegional is hoping to replicate the successes, such as BedZED’s passive heating design that allows the development to go the winter without turning on any heating units. It also hopes to avoid the failings that have plagued the development, like the inability of the biomass hot water heater or reed-bed filtration system to get underway.

Environmentally friendly designs are becoming more and more popular, cost effective and important as climate change gains a larger role in policy initiatives. The new developments that have come about have been innovative and impressive. The BedZED development especially was progressive and impressive. The biggest problem I saw with it though, was not its inability to enact all of its grand ideas. It was the multi-coloured pipes coming out of each roof. Obviously, beauty is in the eye of the beholder, but personally, I am not a fan. The Lorax would balk, not because it was killing the trees but because it reminded him to much like a factory for sneeds (apologies if you have to look that reference up).

Environmentally friendly design can be quite attractive if it is done correctly. I am reminded of my trip to the Adnams distribution centre whilst working for CAMRA a few years ago. The building is designed with the same carbon cutting measures as the BedZED development, but is astonishing to look at. The sedum covered roof blends into the countryside as well as filtering rainwater into storage wells and soaking up carbon dioxide. It’s quite simply beautiful. It shows the value of a building being attractive, as well as environmentally friendly.